LPI Reflection & Development

Step 1: Find and download the “Leadership Practice Inventory_Assessment & Scoring” Microsoft Word document. Enter your name into the header. Record your responses to the 30-item Leadership Practice Inventory. Follow the instructions for calculating your scores on the 5 dimensions. Enter your scores into the “scoring table.” Save this document for submission.

Step 2: Find the “Leadership Practice Inventory_ Interpreting Scores” Microsoft Word document. Read the document and fill in the remaining portions of the “scoring table” (see Step 1) based on the information provided.

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
LPI Reflection & Development
Get an essay WRITTEN FOR YOU, Plagiarism free, and by an EXPERT!
Order Essay

Step 3: Find and download the “Leadership Practice Inventory_ Reflection & Development” Microsoft Word document. Enter your name into the header. Read through the instructions and questions. Complete Step 4 (see below) so that you know how your responses will be graded. Then follow the instructions and answer the “Reflection on Your Scores” questions and the “Developing an Action Plan” questions. Save this document for submission.

Step 4: Find the “Leadership Practice Inventory_ Assignment Scoring Rubric” Microsoft Word document. This rubric depicts what your assignment will be graded based on. It is in your best interest to review this document before answering the “Reflection on Your Scores” questions and the “Developing an Action Plan” questions and completing your assignment. Download this file and enter your name into the header (but don’t make any other changes to the file or its formatting). Save this document for submission. This is what I will use to provide feedback to you regarding your grade.

 

Student Leadership Practices Inventory[1]

 

Instructions: On the next two pages are thirty statements describing various leadership behaviors. Please read each statement carefully. Then rate yourself in terms of how frequently you engage in the behavior described. This is not a test (there are no right or wrong answers). Consider each statement in the context of your employer or the student organization (e.g., club, team, chapter, group, unit, hall, program, project) with which you are most involved. The rating scale provides five choices:

 

Seldom or Rarely

1

 

Once in a While

2

 

Sometimes

3

 

Fairly Often

4

 

Very Frequently

5

 

Please respond to every statement. In selecting the response, be realistic about the extent to which you actually engage in the behavior. Do not answer the item in terms of how you would like to see yourself or in terms of what you should be doing. Answer in terms of how you typically behave. The usefulness of the feedback from this inventory will depend on how honest you are with yourself about how frequently you actually engage in each of these behaviors.

 

How frequently do you typically engage in the following behaviors and actions? Circle or highlight the number that applies to each statement.

I look for opportunities that challenge my skills and abilities.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I describe to others in our organization what we should be capable of accomplishing.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I include others in planning the activities and programs of our organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I share my beliefs about how things can be run most effectively within our organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I encourage others as they work on activities and programs in our organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I keep current on events and activities that might affect our organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I look ahead and communicate about what I believe will affect us in the future.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I treat others with dignity and respect.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I break our organization’s projects down into manageable steps.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I make sure that people in our organization are recognized for their contributions.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I take initiative in experimenting with the way we do things in our organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I am upbeat and positive when talking about what our organization is doing.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I support the decisions that other people in our organization make on their own.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I set a personal example of what I expect from other people.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I praise people for a job well done.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I look for ways to improve whatever project or task I am involved in.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I talk with others about how their own interests can be met by working toward a common goal.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I foster cooperative rather than competitive relationships among people I work with.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I talk about the values and principles that guide my actions.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I give people in our organization support and express appreciation for their contributions.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I ask, “What can we learn from this experience?” when things do not go as we expected.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I speak with conviction about the higher purpose and meaning of what we are doing.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I give others a great deal of freedom and choice in deciding how to do their work.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

Seldom or Rarely

1

 

Once in a While

2

 

Sometimes

3

 

Fairly Often

4

 

Very Frequently

5

 

How frequently do you typically engage in the following behaviors and actions? Circle or highlight the number that applies to each statement.

I follow through on the promises and commitments I make in this organization.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I find ways for us to celebrate our accomplishments publicly.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I let others experiment and take risks even when outcomes are uncertain.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I show my enthusiasm and excitement about what our organization is doing.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I provide opportunities for others to take on leadership responsibilities.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I make sure that we set goals and make specific plans for the projects we undertake.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

I make it a point to tell others about the good work done by our organizations.

 

 

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

Totaling the Dimension Scores

This questionnaire assesses your leadership skills on five leadership practice dimensions. There are six items in each of the five dimensions, as depicted in the second row of the table below. For each dimension, sum your responses for the items included in the dimension and enter your scores in the row marked “Dimension totals” to get your five dimension scores. Each of your totals can range from a low of 6 to a high of 30.

Scoring Table

Dimensions

 

Challenging the Process

 

Inspiring a Shared Vision

 

Enabling Others to Act

 

Modeling the Way

 

Encouraging the Heart

 

Items included in dimension

 

1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26

 

2, 7, 12, 17, 22, 27

 

3, 8, 13, 18, 23, 28

 

4, 9, 14, 19, 24, 29

 

5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30

 

Dimension totals

 

19

 

15

 

22

 

23

 

20

 

Dimension ranks

 

4

 

5

 

2

 

1

 

3

 

Approximate Percentiles

 

20%

 

10%

 

35%

 

37%

 

23%

 

Dimension levels

 

L

 

L

 

M

 

M

 

L

See the document titled “Interpreting your LPI Scores” for information regarding how to fill in the rest of the scoring table.

 

Interpreting Your LPI Scores[1]

Now that you have completed the Student Leadership Practice Inventory, it is time to interpret your scores and learn more about The Leadership Challenge model.

Ranking Your Dimension Scores

Each person has their own unique mix of leadership practices that they are comfortable (or uncomfortable) with. In the row in the scoring table labeled “Dimension ranks”, write “1” under the leadership practice dimension with the highest score, “2” under the next-highest score, and so on. This ranking represents the leadership practices with which you feel most comfortable, second-most comfortable, and so on. The practice you identify with a “5” is the practice with which you feel least comfortable.

Percentile Scores

Look at the “Chart for Graphing Your Scores.” The column to the far left represents the Student LPI-Self percentile rankings for more than 1,200 student leaders. A percentile ranking is determined by the percentage of people who score at or below a given number. For example, if your total self-rating for “Challenging the Process” is at the 60th percentile line on the “Chart for Graphing Your Scores,” this means that you assessed yourself higher than 60 percent of all people who have completed the Student LPI; you would be in the top 40 percent in this leadership practice. Enter your approximate percentiles for each of the five dimensions in the “Approximate percentiles” row of the scoring table.

Studies indicate that a “high” score is one at or above the 70th percentile, a “low”, score is one at or below the 30th percentile, and a score that falls between those ranges is considered “moderate.” Using these criteria, write an “H” (for “High”), an “M” (for “Moderate”), or an “L” (for “Low”) for each leadership practice in the row labeled “Dimension levels” in the scoring table. Compared to other student leaders around the country, where do your leadership practices tend to fall? (Given a “normal distribution,” it is expected that most people’s scores will fall within the moderate range.)

 

Understanding the Student Leadership Practices Inventory Dimensions

Leadership is an observable, learnable set of practices. Contrary to some myths, it is not a mystical and ethereal process that cannot be understood by ordinary people. Given the opportunity for feedback and practice, those with the desire and persistence to lead – to make a difference – can substantially improve their ability to do so.

The Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) is part of an extensive research project into the everyday actions and behaviors of people, at all levels and across a variety of settings, as they are leading. Research has identified five practices that are common to all leadership experiences. The LPI is a tool, not a test, designed to assess your current leadership skills. It identifies your areas of strength as well as areas of leadership that need to be further developed.

The Student LPI helps you discover the extent to which you engage in the following five leadership practices:

Challenging the Process. Leaders are pioneers – people who seek out new opportunities and are willing to change the status quo. They innovate, experiment, and explore ways to improve the organization. They treat mistakes as learning experiences. Leaders also stay prepared to meet whatever challenges may confront them. Challenging the Process involves

· Searching for opportunities

· Experimenting and taking risks

As an example of Challenging the Process, one student related how innovative thinking helped him win a student class election: “I challenged the process in more than one way. First, I wanted people to understand that elections are not necessarily popularity contests, so I campaigned on the issues and did not promise things that could not possibly be done. Second, I challenged the incumbent positions. They thought they would win easily because they were incumbents, but I showed them that no one has an inherent right to a position.”

Challenging the Process for a student serving as treasurer of her sorority meant examining and abandoning some of her leadership beliefs: “I used to believe, ‘If you want to do something right, do it yourself.’ I found out the hard way that this is impossible to do…One day I was ready to just give up the position because I could no longer handle all of the work. My adviser noticed that I was overwhelmed, and she turned to me and said three magic words: ‘Use your committee.’ The best piece of advice I would pass along about being an effective leader is that it is okay to experiment with letting others do the work”

Inspiring a Shared Vision. Leaders look toward and beyond the horizon. They envision the future with a positive and hopeful outlook. Leaders are expressive and attract other people to their organization and teams through their genuineness. They communicate and show others how their interests can be met through commitment to a common purpose. Inspiring a Shared Vision involves

· Envisioning an uplifting future

· Enlisting others in a common vision

Describing his experience as president of his high school class, one student wrote: “It was our vision to get the class united and to be able to win the spirit trophy…I told my officers that we could do anything we set our minds on. Believe in yourself and believe in your ability to accomplish things.”

Enabling Others to Act. Leaders infuse people with energy and confidence, developing relationships based on mutual trust. They stress collaborative goals. They actively involve others in planning, giving them discretion to make their own decisions. Leaders ensure that people feel strong and capable. Enabling Others to Act involves

· Fostering collaboration

· Strengthening people

It is not necessary to be in a traditional leadership position to put these principles into practice. Here is an example from a student who led his team as a team member, not from a traditional position of power: “I helped my team members feel strong and capable by encouraging everyone to practice with the same amount of intensity that they played games with. Our practices improved throughout the year, and by the end of the year had reached the point I was striving for: complete involvement among all players, helping each other to perform at our very best during practice times.”

Modeling the Way. Leaders are clear about their personal values and beliefs. They keep people and projects on course by behaving consistently with these values and modeling how they expect others to act. Leaders also plan projects and break them down into achievable steps, creating opportunities for small wins. By focusing on key priorities, they make it easier for others to achieve goals. Modeling the Way involves

· Setting the example

· Achieving small wins

Working in a business environment taught one student the importance of Modeling the Way. She writes: “I proved I was serious because I was the first one on the job and the last one to leave. I came prepared to work and make the tools available to my crew. I worked alongside them and in no way portrayed an attitude of superiority. Instead, we were in this together.”

Encouraging the Heart. Leaders encourage people to persist in their efforts by linking recognition with accomplishments and visibly recognizing contributions to the common vision. They express pride in the achievements of the group or organization, letting others know that their efforts are appreciated. Leaders also find ways to celebrate milestones. They nurture a team spirit, which enables people to sustain continued efforts. Encouraging the Heart involves

· Recognizing individual contributions

· Celebrating team accomplishments

While organizing and running a day camp, one student recognized volunteers and celebrated accomplishments through her actions. She explains: “We had a pizza party with the children on the last day of the day camp. Later, the volunteers were sent thank you notes and ‘valuable volunteer awards’ personally signed by the day campers. The pizza party, thank you notes, and awards served to encourage the hearts of the volunteers in the hopes that they might return for next year’s day camp.”

Developing an Action Plan

The Student Leadership Practices Inventory is based on “The Leadership Challenge” (written by Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner), which is one of the best-selling books on leadership. The Leadership Challenge (and the associated five dimensions/practices of leadership) is a transformational theory of leadership. The Leadership Challenge model is also development-oriented, and outlines several practices and that anyone can engage in to further develop their leadership skills. Some individuals are great leaders, and other individuals are abysmal leaders, but ALL individuals can develop and improve their leadership effectiveness regardless of their current level of leadership.

The following are ten suggestions for getting started on meeting the leadership challenge.

Challenge the Process

· Fix something

· Adopt the “great ideas” of others

Inspire a Shared Vision

· Let others know how you feel

· Recount your “personal best”

Enable Others to Act

· Always say ”we”

· Make heroes of other people

Model the Way

· Lead by example

· Create opportunities for small wins

Encourage the Heart

· Write “thank you” notes

· Celebrate, and link your celebrations to your organization’s values

 

LPI Reflection & Development[1]

For this portion of the assignment, you will reflect on your strengths and weaknesses and create an action plan for developing your leadership. You will get out of this assignment what you put into it. Your responses should include thoughtful reflections of your leadership skills and a thoughtful, concrete, specific action plan. A shallow reflection and/or vague plan will neither help your leadership development nor result in a good grade. Before answering the questions that follow, be sure to review the “LPI Assignment Scoring Rubric” for addition guidance regarding how to respond and how you will be graded.

Reflection on Your Scores

1a) Based on your LPI results, what are your strengths? That is, which one of the leadership practices and behaviors are you most comfortable with (if there is a tie, just pick one)? Why?

1b) How can you do more related to this dimension (it may be helpful to look at and reflect on your responses to the items associated with this dimension)?

2a) Based on your LPI results, what are your areas for improvement? That is, which one of the leadership practices and behaviors are you least comfortable with (if there is a tie, just pick one)? Why?

2b) What can you do to use this practice more frequently (it may be helpful to look at and reflect on your responses to the items associated with this dimension)? That is, what will it take to feel more comfortable?

 

Developing an Action Plan

Choose one of the five leadership practices/dimensions that you would like to further develop, and develop an action plan for developing your leadership skills related to this dimension. Although you do not have to choose your weakest dimension, it would be most beneficial to develop one of your weaker areas.

Before developing the action plan, be sure to more thoroughly familiarize yourself with this dimension by closely reviewing:

· The LPI items associated with this dimension.

· The narrative description of this dimension and examples from the “Interpreting Your LPI Scores” document.

· The “Developing an Action Plan” suggestions for this dimension briefly outlined at the end of the “Interpreting Your LPI Scores” document.

The main purpose of this assignment is use one of the most renown leadership development programs (i.e., The Leadership Challenge) to further develop your leadership skills. Therefore, your action plan should be based on, grounded in, and linked to the Leadership Practice Inventory and the one leadership dimension/practice you have chosen. Also, your action plan should be specific, focused on leadership development (not personal or professional development), and focused on the “here and now.” It should be something you actually can (and hopefully will) do over the next few months or year. It should NOT be a hypothetical, make-believe, general, or generic plan.

1) What would you like to be better able to do? Be sure to tie your response to the LPI and your chosen leadership practice/dimension.

2) What actions will you take? Be specific. What is the context (what group or organization)? What specific actions will you take?

3) What is the first action you will take? Who will be involved? When will you begin?

4) Complete this sentence: “I will know I have improved in this leadership skill when …”

5) When will you review your progress?

Homework Paper
Order NOW For A 10% Discount!
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Our Advantages

Plagiarism Free Papers

All our papers are original and written from scratch. We will email you a plagiarism report alongside your completed paper once done.

Free Revisions

All papers are submitted ahead of time. We do this to allow you time to point out any area you would need revision on, and help you for free.

Free Title-page

A title page preceeds all your paper content. Here, you put all your personal information and this we give out for free.

Free Bibliography

Without a reference/bibliography page, any academic paper is incomplete and doesnt qualify for grading. We also offer this for free.

Originality & Security

At Homeworkpaper.net, we take confidentiality seriously and all your personal information is stored safely and do not share it with third parties for any reasons whatsoever. Our work is original and we send plagiarism reports alongside every paper.

24/7 Customer Support

Our agents are online 24/7. Feel free to contact us through email or talk to our live agents.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

We'll send you the first draft for approval by at
Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

We work around the clock to see best customer experience.

Pricing

Flexible Pricing

Our prices are pocket friendly and you can do partial payments. When that is not enough, we have a free enquiry service.

Communication

Admission help & Client-Writer Contact

When you need to elaborate something further to your writer, we provide that button.

Deadlines

Paper Submission

We take deadlines seriously and our papers are submitted ahead of time. We are happy to assist you in case of any adjustments needed.

Reviews

Customer Feedback

Your feedback, good or bad is of great concern to us and we take it very seriously. We are, therefore, constantly adjusting our policies to ensure best customer/writer experience.